Okeechobee Community Theatre’s, ‘The Tin Woman’, opens March 1

Special to the Lake Okeechobee News
A bossy nurse (Louise Chandler) instructs new heart recipient, Joy O’Malley (Kara DePasquale), in how to deal with post-operative pain in a scene from “The Tin Woman.” The comedy-drama opens Friday for a five-performance run by Okeechobee Community Theatre.

OKEECHOBEE — The final production of Okeechobee Community Theatre’s (OCT) 40th season, which opens Friday night for a five-performance run, is something quite out of the ordinary, but it’s also something quite satisfying.

In the new play, “The Tin Woman,” playwright Sean Grennan manages to find real humor in a most unlikely situation. Joy O’Malley, a young single woman, receives a life-saving heart transplant, but then spirals into a period of depression and self-doubt. She wonders if she is indeed worthy of this second chance at life, since a young man — who might have been a more valuable human being — had to die for her to receive it. At the same time, the audience is introduced to the grieving family of the heart donor, who was the victim of an auto accident.

Special to the Lake Okeechobee News
Jack, a deceased heart donor, is a constant presence in spirit in the new play “The Tin Woman.” Here he comforts Joy, the young woman who received his heart. Okeechobee Community Theatre performers are Josh Van Wormer and Kara DePasquale.

This emotional subject, based on a true story, is explored with grace and compassion, allowing for laughs in all the right places. Besides being extremely entertaining, it’s also a thought-provoking piece that will stay with you long after you leave the theatre.

OCT director, Ron Hayes, says that the organization received some unexpected special assistance while producing the play. “Sean Grennan personally reached out to us via e-mail as we began our rehearsals, providing us with some of his insight into the characters, and even with some additional dialogue, not in the scripts, which we have incorporated into our production. We’ve been able to stay in touch during the process.”

Special to the Lake Okeechobee News
Joy O’Malley (Kara DePasquale) suffers from depression following a heart transplant, questioning whether she is deserving of the second chance at life it has afforded her. Despite the serious subject matter, the play, “The Tin Woman” by Okeechobee Community Theatre contains a great deal of humor.

“‘The Tin Woman’ has been performed by some very high caliber theatres,” Hayes says, “but I’m confident that Mr. Grennan would be equally impressed by what we’ve put together. Our cast is made up of some of our most seasoned and experienced actors, who are breathing real life into their roles. The climax is sure to bring a tear to the eye.”

Special to the Lake Okeechobee News
Hank and Alice Borden (John Garner and Connie Gerard) grieve for their son, Jack, who was killed in an auto accident. The couple prepares to meet the young lady who received his transplanted heart in a touching climactic scene from the production of “The Tin Woman,” being presented by Okeechobee Community Theatre.

“The Tin Woman” opens Friday evening at 8 p.m. at the theatre at 610 S.W. Second Ave. in Okeechobee, one block west of Golden Corral restaurant. Additional performances will be at 8 p.m. on Saturday, March 2, and Friday, March 8. There are also matinées at 2 p.m. on Saturdays, March 2 and March 9. Tickets are $12 each, and can be purchased at the off-site box office in the Plaza 300 Building in the 300 block of N. W. Fifth Street, suite 314, ground floor, from 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. Remaining tickets can be purchased at the theatre beginning one hour before showtimes. Cash or check only, no credit cards are accepted.

More information can be obtained by visiting the theatre website, okeechobeecommunitytheatre.com, or by calling 863-763-1307.

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